antisémitisme,Art,Politics

«Two Brotherless Peoples»: On the Constitutive Traumas of Class Struggle

by Akis Gavriilidis

Published in Psychoanalysis, Culture & Society (2008) 13, 143–162.

 

Abstract:

 

In this article, I use as a starting point a “social symptom” showing that Greek left patriots have mixed feelings towards Jews, whom they perceive as a threat but also as a model for imitation, on account of their universally accepted victim status. I consider that these feelings are linked to a specific subjectivity formation, which I term “radical nationalism” and I attribute to the specificities of 20th century Greek history: to the civil war during the 1940s, and the subsequent handling –or non handling– of the painful memories from this split in the national subject. Accordingly, in the first part I go through the genealogy of this subjectivity formation and its affective economy; but also, departing from this specific historical example, I try to draw some more general conclusions about social antagonism and the nature of the traumas in which it results–or really, in which it consists. Then, in the last part, I go back to a corpus of social discursive material –declarations, articles in newspapers, public rallies– and try to show how these illustrate my construction and in what sense they can be construed as efforts to suture the chasm of social antagonism.

 

Key words: nationalism; social groups; trauma; self-victimisation; enjoyment Συνέχεια

Κλασσικό
Γλώσσα,Δίκαιο,Επιτελεστικότητα

Γιατί (πώς) μπορεί να αποβεί ευεργετική η δίωξη κατά της κας Τριανταφύλλου

του Άκη Γαβριηλίδη

Η πρόσφατη άσκηση δίωξης εναντίον της πεζογράφου και αρθρογράφου Σώτης Τριανταφύλλου με βάση τον αντιρατσιστικό νόμο, προκάλεσε αντιρρήσεις ή επιφυλάξεις από πολλές πλευρές.

Πέρα από διαφορές ύφους και έντασης, το κύριο αντεπιχείρημα ήταν ότι δεν πρέπει να διώκονται οι λόγοι, αλλά μόνο οι πράξεις, διότι κάτι τέτοιο μπορεί να οδηγήσει σε καταχρήσεις, όπως έχει συμβεί στο παρελθόν, και ότι οι τυχόν διαφορές απόψεων πρέπει να επιλύονται με δημόσιο διάλογο και επιχειρήματα, όχι στα δικαστήρια.

Η επιχειρηματολογία αυτή είναι αναμφίβολα σοβαρή και βάσιμη. Ωστόσο, στο παρόν σημείωμα θα ήθελα να εξετάσω μήπως οι φόβοι που γεννιούνται από ιστορικά προηγούμενα καμιά φορά μας τυφλώνουν μπροστά σε τωρινές απειλές. Στο κάτω κάτω, ζούμε σε μια Συνέχεια

Κλασσικό
national identity,Performativity,Politics,Translation

Name trouble: the «so-called people» and the communism of language

by Akis Gavriilidis

I. Introduction

In an interview to the Macedonian Television in February 2011, the British diplomat Robin O’Neil declared:

“The Greece-Macedonia name row is the most bizarre diplomatic dispute in Europe today. No one outside of Greece can perceive why should Macedonia change its name. What is Greece’s national interest in doing this? Greece has not suffered in any way as a result of Macedonia’s existence under the current name in the past 20 years, and Greece never opposed Macedonia’s existence as part of SFR Yugoslavia»[1].

He also said that “the consistent Greek opposition to Macedonia’s NATO and EU accession is especially difficult to understand” (ibid.).

O’Neil here states the obvious as regards diplomatic practice and international relations, but what he says is also valid epistemologically. I think that his statement is a very useful way to start a treatment of the issue from a political theory point of view as well: in fact, if diplomats had a hard time to figure out what Greece is trying to achieve or to avoid by its reaction, social theorists did not do much better up to Συνέχεια

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